Barlaston Hall and parkland

1921 Barlaston Hall was built for Thomas Mills in 1756-8, to replace the existing manor house that he had acquired through marriage. Thomas Mills, an attorney of Leek, married Esther Bagnall, heiress to the manor of Barlaston, in 1742. The estate had originally been purchased by her grandfather in 1671. The hall and parkland came into the possession of the Adderley family in 1816 when Rosamund Mills co-heiress of the Barlaston estate, married Ralph Adderley of Coton Hall, Hanbury, Staffordshire. Their son Ralph Thomas Adderley was High Sheriff of Staffordshire in 1866. Following his death in 1931 the 380-acre (1.5 km2) estate was put up for sale and was bought, after protracted negotiations, by the Wedgwood pottery company in 1937. Barlaston Hall was occupied by the Bank of England during the Second World War, after which Wedgwood allowed it to be used for a range of local functions.

Wedgwood continued to maintain the Hall until the late 1960s after which the Hall was vandalised and lead removed from the roof. It also suffered major subsidence due to coal mining. The house had been built across a geological fault, and 4-inch (100 mm) wide cracks had opened in its walls. By the early 1980s, the hall was in a parlous state of decay. On 29 September 1981, Wedgwood offered to sell Barlaston Hall to SAVE Britain's Heritage for £1. An independent trust was established to restore the house. Grants from English Heritage, the Historic Buildings Council, the Manifold Trust and a loan from the National Heritage Memorial Fund, allowed the external restoration to be largely completed in the early 1990s.This involved extensive works including inserting a concrete raft under the building to protect against further mining subsidence. In 1992 SAVE decided to sell the Hall.. It was purchased by James and Carol Hall who completed the internal restoration over a period of more than 5 years. Barlaston Hall has returned to being a private family home.

Barlaston Hall, a compact ‘villa’, was built by architect Sir Robert Taylor (1714 -1788),. The hall has a red-brick exterior, and is one of a few of Taylor's buildings which retain his trademark octagonal and diamond glazing in the sash windows.

Barlaston Church

The old parish church dedicated to St John the Baptist is located next to Barlaston Hall and was built to the designs of the celebrated local architect Charles Lynam between 1886-8, whilst retaining the west tower from the original medieval building. In 1981 the building had to be closed owing to mining subsidence. Barlaston church, was not under the patronage of the Mills/Adderley family but of Lord Gower of Trentham

 

Sir Robert Taylor (1714–1788) was a notable English 18th century architect

Born at Woodford, Essex in 1714, Taylor followed in his father's footsteps and started working as a stonemason and sculptor, spending time as a pupil of Sir Henry Cheere, (1702-1781) at the sculptor's yard in Westminster, London. Despite some successful commissions he turned to architecture and ultimately became one of the leading architects of the period.

Through his connections, as an architect, Taylor was appointed as architect to the Bank of England until his death, (caused by catching a chill at his friend Asgill's funeral), in September 1788.

In 1783 Taylor served as a Sheriff of London and was knighted the same year.

The Taylor Institution, Oxford University's centre for the study of medieval and modern European languages and literatures, takes its name from a bequest from Sir Robert for the purpose of "establishing a foundation for the teaching and improving the European languages". 

 

Charles Lynam (1829-1921)

Charles Lynam was born on 9 February 1829 at Colwich, Staffordshire, the son of George and Hannah Lynam.. His father was an architect and surveyor with a practice in Glebe Street, Stoke upon Trent. Charles Lynam was educated at Christ's Hospital School, London, and worked for two years with his father before he was articled to a firm of London architects. He returned to Staffordshire and joined his father's business in 1850, and in that year, through the influence of Herbert Minton, was appointed architect for the Stokeville Building Society. In 1853 Charles was taken into partnership in by his father.. Lynam built up a large private practice and designed numerous public buildings, including the Stoke upon Trent Free Library and Baths (1877-8), the Stoke upon Trent new market complex (1883), the Hartshill cemetery chapels (1883) and with another architect, Nicholl, the North Staffordshire Infirmary when it moved from Etruria to Hartshill. 

1857 Charles Lynam married Lucy, daughter of Dr Robert Carner, the local historian. She bore him 14 children. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects.in 1882. In 1903 Charles Lynam was elected mayor of Stoke. 

Lynam was a keen archaeologist and became vice-president of the Archaeological Institute and was elected a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries in 1895. He acted as surveyor for Lichfield diocese for many years, and became a leading authority on local churches.

Charles Lynam died at Cliff Bank House, Stoke on Trent, on 21 February 1921.

 

archive folder
  • Letter to Stone RDC informing them of Wedgwoods plan to acquire Barlaston Hall estate, page 1, © The Wedgwood museum

    Letter to Stone RDC informing them of Wedgwoods plan to acquire Barlaston Hall estate, page 1

  • Letter to Stone RDC informing them of Wedgwoods plan to acquire Barlaston Hall estate, page 2, © The Wedgwood museum

    Letter to Stone RDC informing them of Wedgwoods plan to acquire Barlaston Hall estate, page 2

  • Letter to Stone RDC informing them of Wedgwoods plan to acquire Barlaston Hall estate, page 3, © The Wedgwood museum

    Letter to Stone RDC informing them of Wedgwoods plan to acquire Barlaston Hall estate, page 3

  • Letter giving Murray and White control over Barlaston Hall, © The Wedgwood museum

    Letter giving Murray and White control over Barlaston Hall

  • Minutes of meting 1937 containing projected costs, page 1, © The Wedgwood museum

    Minutes of meting 1937 containing projected costs, page 1

  • Minutes of meting 1937 containing projected costs, page 2, © The Wedgwood museum

    Minutes of meting 1937 containing projected costs, page 2

  • Minutes of meting 1937 containing projected costs, page 3, © The Wedgwood museum

    Minutes of meting 1937 containing projected costs, page 3

  • Minutes of meting 1937 containing projected costs, page 4, © The Wedgwood museum

    Minutes of meting 1937 containing projected costs, page 4

  • Minutes of meeting held on 15/5/1937, cost of buildings, © The Wedgwood museum

    Minutes of meeting held on 15/5/1937, cost of buildings

  • Minutes of meting held 26/4/37, © The Wedgwood museum

    Minutes of meting held 26/4/37

  • Minutes of meeting held 15/4/1937, page 1, © The Wedgwood museum

    Minutes of meeting held 15/4/1937, page 1

  • Minutes of meeting held 15/4/1937, page 2, © The Wedgwood museum

    Minutes of meeting held 15/4/1937, page 2

  • Minutes of meeting held 15/4/1937, page 3, © The Wedgwood museum

    Minutes of meeting held 15/4/1937, page 3

  • Minutes of meeting held 15/4/1937, page 4, © The Wedgwood museum

    Minutes of meeting held 15/4/1937, page 4

  • Minutes of meeting held 8/4/1937,page 1, © The Wedgwood museum

    Minutes of meeting held 8/4/1937,page 1

  • Minutes of meeting held 8/4/1937,page 2, © The Wedgwood museum

    Minutes of meeting held 8/4/1937,page 2

  • Minutes of meeting held 8/4/1937,page 3, © The Wedgwood museum

    Minutes of meeting held 8/4/1937,page 3

  • Minutes of meeting held 26/3/1937, page 1, © The Wedgwood museum

    Minutes of meeting held 26/3/1937, page 1

  • Minutes of meeting held 26/3/1937, page 2, © The Wedgwood museum

    Minutes of meeting held 26/3/1937, page 2

  • Minutes of meeting held 26/3/1937, page 3, © The Wedgwood museum

    Minutes of meeting held 26/3/1937, page 3

  • Letter about painting contract to Barlaston Hall, © The Wedgwood museum

    Letter about painting contract to Barlaston Hall

  • Letter about Murray and Whites plans for Barlaston Hall, page 1, © The Wedgwood museum

    Letter about Murray and Whites plans for Barlaston Hall, page 1

  • Letter about Murray and Whites plans for Barlaston Hall, page 2, © The Wedgwood museum

    Letter about Murray and Whites plans for Barlaston Hall, page 2

  • Letter from White re Barlaston Hall, page 1, © The Wedgwood museum

    Letter from White re Barlaston Hall, page 1

  • Letter from White re Barlaston Hall, page 2, © The Wedgwood museum

    Letter from White re Barlaston Hall, page 2

  • Letter complaining about costs of surveys at Barlaston hall, page 1, © The Wedgwood museum

    Letter complaining about costs of surveys at Barlaston hall, page 1

  • Letter complaining about costs of surveys at Barlaston hall, page 2, © The Wedgwood museum

    Letter complaining about costs of surveys at Barlaston hall, page 2

  • Letter, reply  about costs of surveys at Barlaston hall, page 1, © The Wedgwood museum

    Letter, reply about costs of surveys at Barlaston hall, page 1

  • Letter, reply  about costs of surveys at Barlaston hall, page 2, © The Wedgwood museum

    Letter, reply about costs of surveys at Barlaston hall, page 2

  • Letter, reply  about costs of surveys at Barlaston hall, page 3, © The Wedgwood museum

    Letter, reply about costs of surveys at Barlaston hall, page 3

  • Letter, reply  about costs of surveys at Barlaston hall, page 4, © The Wedgwood museum

    Letter, reply about costs of surveys at Barlaston hall, page 4

  • Breakdown of costs incurred in levelling Barlaston Estate, page 1, © The Wedgwood museum

    Breakdown of costs incurred in levelling Barlaston Estate, page 1

  • Breakdown of costs incurred in levelling Barlaston Estate, page 2, © The Wedgwood museum

    Breakdown of costs incurred in levelling Barlaston Estate, page 2

  • Breakdown of costs incurred in levelling Barlaston Estate, page 3, © The Wedgwood museum

    Breakdown of costs incurred in levelling Barlaston Estate, page 3

  • Breakdown of costs incurred in levelling Barlaston Estate, page 4, © The Wedgwood museum

    Breakdown of costs incurred in levelling Barlaston Estate, page 4

  • Breakdown of costs incurred in levelling Barlaston Estate, page 5, © The Wedgwood museum

    Breakdown of costs incurred in levelling Barlaston Estate, page 5