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Appledore vase - 1980s

Appledore vase
    Appledore vase

This bone china vase is decorated with the Appledore pattern. The pattern has a feint printed outline in brown and is filled in with enamel colours. The rim and foot have gold edge linings. A turquoise leaf design bounds the interior rim and is also used to create two decorative cartouches on either side of the vase's body. A cornucopia of grapes decorates the centre of each cartouche on a lemon background.

This bone china vase is decorated with the Appledore pattern. The pattern has a feint printed outline in brown and is filled in with enamel colours. The rim and foot have gold edge linings. A turquoise leaf design bounds the interior rim and is also used to create two decorative cartouches on either side of the vase's body. A cornucopia of grapes decorates the centre of each cartouche on a lemon background. Although Appledore was first produced in 1936 it was only introduced onto bone china fancies and giftware in 1982. The pattern differed from the original Appledore and has a distinct pattern number of its own (R 4687). This vase is shape number 5222 and in 1982 would have retailed at £18.95. Appledore bone china fancies went out of production in 1987.

  • Type of object: Ornamental ware/vase
  • Mark: (Portland Vase device)
    [Printed in black]
    WEDGWOOD®
    Bone China
    MADE IN ENGLAND
    APPLEDORE
    [Printed in brown]
  • Year produced: 1980s
  • Body: Bone china
  • Glaze: clear glaze
  • Material: ceramic
  • Decoration: hand-enamelled, transfer-printed, edge-lined
  • Accession number: 13430
  • Dimensions: 175 mm (diameter), 98 mm (height)

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Glossary

  • Bone china

    Bone china

    A porcelain made from clay and feldspathic rock with the addition of about 50 percent of calcined animal bone. Josiah Wedgwood II introduced bone china at the Wedgwood Etruria factory in 1812.

  • Enamel colours

    Enamel colours

    Colours derived from metallic oxides that are usually hand-applied onto the glaze. These are then fired to ‘fix’ the colours to the ware.

  • Cornucopia

    Cornucopia

    A horn of plenty - usually overflowing with fruit, vegetables or floral decoration.