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Black Astbury crescent-shaped side plate - 1974

Black Astbury crescent-shaped side plate, © Wedgwood Museum
    Black Astbury crescent-shaped side plate
    © Wedgwood Museum

This bone china side plate is covered with the Black Astbury pattern. The visible bone china on the exterior of the body has a cream wash and a broad black band is laid at the top. This band has a printed gold outline and is decorated with raised paste gilding, which enhances the design of leave and, stylised flowers. The plentiful use of gold, with raised paste and leaf gilding, contributed to it being the most-expensive pattern retailed by Josiah Wedgwood and Sons.

This bone china side plate is covered with the Black Astbury pattern. The visible bone china on the exterior of the body has a cream wash and a broad black band is laid at the top. This band has a printed gold outline and is decorated with raised paste gilding, which enhances the design of leave and, stylised flowers. The plentiful use of gold, with raised paste and leaf gilding, contributed to it being the most-expensive pattern retailed by Josiah Wedgwood and Sons. At launch in 1974 this item would have retailed at £86.35.

  • Type of object: Dinner ware/side plate
  • Mark: [Portland vase]
    [printed in black ink]
    WEDGWOOD®
    Bone China
    MADE IN ENGLAND
    [printed in gold]
  • Year produced: 1974
  • Body: Bone china
  • Glaze: cream
  • Material: ceramic
  • Decoration: transfer-printed, gilded, ground-layed, raised gold paste
  • Accession number: 11852
  • Dimensions: 160 mm (width), 216 mm (length), 18 mm (height)

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Glossary

  • Bone china

    Bone china

    A porcelain made from clay and feldspathic rock with the addition of about 50 percent of calcined animal bone. Josiah Wedgwood II introduced bone china at the Wedgwood Etruria factory in 1812.

  • Gilding

    Gilding

    The application of gold to the pottery body. During the mid-eighteenth century gold leaf was mixed with honey, applied to the ware, and fired at a low temperature to ‘fix’ the gilding. By 1855 a liquid gold had been developed, and a bright-burnished gold was in use from 1860.