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Black Basalt chocolate jug and cover - 1783

Black Basalt chocolate jug and cover, photography M.Coupe, © Wedgwood Museum
    Black Basalt chocolate jug and cover, photography M.Coupe
    © Wedgwood Museum

Chocolate jugs such as this were also known as coffee pot ewers. This example, from c.1783, is made from Black Basalt and is encaustic enamalled with a decoration called 'Running anthemion'

Chocolate jugs such as this were also known as coffee pot ewers. This example, from c.1783, is made from Black Basalt and is encaustic enamalled with a decoration called 'Running anthemion'

  • Type of object: Teaware/chocolate jug
  • Mark: WEDGWOOD
    (Impressed)
  • Year produced: 1783
  • Body: Black Basalt
  • Glaze: unglazed
  • Material: ceramic
  • Decoration: encaustic painted
  • Accession number: 1144, 1144a
  • Dimensions: 250 mm (height), 135 mm (width, handle to spout), 115 mm (depth)

Other images

Glossary

  • Encaustic painting

    Encaustic painting

    Developed by Josiah Wedgwood I for the purpose of imitating Greek and Italian vases decorated in the red-figure style. The most usual colour combinations utilised are red and white, although green and blue encaustic enamels are also known. The surface of the colours is matt as well as being smooth and durable.

     

    Encaustic painting was a technique of decorating black basalt pieces developed by Josiah Wedgwood principally for the purpose of emulating the classical ceramics referred to as Etruscan wares. It was also employed on cane ware and rosso antico bodies. The surface of the colours is matt and smooth. Wedgwood patented the technique in 1769, which compelled him to reveal the composition and technique. This was the only patent taken out by Josiah in his lifetime. Encaustic decorating was continued at the Etruria factory from time to time during the 19th century.