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Bone china 'Landscape Pattern' teapot and cover - c.1813

Bone china 'Landscape Pattern' teapot stand and cover, © Wedgwood Museum
    Bone china 'Landscape Pattern' teapot stand and cover
    © Wedgwood Museum

Part tea service; hand-painted. Pattern 685, British scenic views, each named in red script on the base John Cutts c.1813

Part tea service; hand-painted. Pattern 685, British scenic views, each named in red script on the base John Cutts c.1813

  • Type of object: Teaware/teapot
  • Mark: Ulls Water Cumberland
    [Painted on teapot]
    V.Nr Paddington Middlesex
    [Painted on teapot]
    C.16
    [Painted on stand]
    Dovedale
    [Painted on stand]
    685
    [Painted on stand]
  • Year produced: c.1813
  • Body: Bone china
  • Material: ceramic
  • Decoration: hand-painted, edge-lined
  • Accession number: 5268x, 5268y, 5268z
  • Dimensions: 152 mm (diameter), 273 mm (width), 155 mm (height)

Other images

Related people

  • John Cutts

    John Cutts

    Cutts was originally a landscape painter at the Pixton factory in Derbyshire. In 1812 he joined Wedgwood but was not particularly highly thought of by Josiah II who said that he would, ‘not suit as a flower painter and probably not as a landscape painter’. He seems to have left Wedgwood’s employment in 1816 and set up his own business as an enameller and gilder in Hanley. He took his sons into the business and by 1842 the firm of ‘John Cutts & Sons’ was employing 50 people.

Glossary

  • Bone china

    Bone china

    A porcelain made from clay and feldspathic rock with the addition of about 50 percent of calcined animal bone. Josiah Wedgwood II introduced bone china at the Wedgwood Etruria factory in 1812.

  • First Period bone china

    First Period bone china

    'First Period' bone china was produced by Wedgwood  around 1810 - 1820, although the product had originally been perfected by Spode. For Wedgwood it was not a success at first and was withdrawn from the product range quite quickly. Owing mainly to competitive pressure and Wedgwood's inability to match fashionable tastes, bone china had been introduced far too quickly in order to keep up with other factories who were surging ahead with its development.