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Bone china plate, commissioned by The National Art Collections Fund, designed by Eduardo Paolozzi - After 1989

Bone china plate, commissioned by The National Art Collections Fund, designed by Eduardo Paolozzi
    Bone china plate, commissioned by The National Art Collections Fund, designed by Eduardo Paolozzi

The National Art Collections Fund initiated a series of Art Plates as part of a series of commissions of contemporary art in aid of its Modern Art Fund. In 1989 and again in 1990, the Fund commissioned two collections of contemporary prints by distinguished artists. The artists commissioned for this new series of six limited edition plates included Peter Blake, Patrick Caulfield, Bruce McLean, Sir Eduardo Paolozzi and John Piper. The project was sponsored by Glaxo and Wedgwood produced the plates.

The National Art Collections Fund initiated a series of Art Plates as part of a series of commissions of contemporary art in aid of its Modern Art Fund. In 1989 and again in 1990, the Fund commissioned two collections of contemporary prints by distinguished artists. The artists commissioned for this new series of six limited edition plates included Peter Blake, Patrick Caulfield, Bruce McLean, Sir Eduardo Paolozzi and John Piper. The project was sponsored by Glaxo and Wedgwood produced the plates. Eduardo Paolozzi plate entitled ‘FABULA’ is decorated at the center with printed design of a circus scene. Decoration applied through lithograph, taken from a hand enameled silk screen print. A clear glaze has been applied to decoration, outer edge a Matt finish, back of plate has also been finished in Matt.

  • Type of object: Ornamental ware/plates and platters
  • Mark: One of an edition of 500 in a series of six designs
    commissioned by The National Art Collection Fund & Wedgwood
    [Portland vase in black ink]
    WEDGWOOD®
    Bone China
    MADE IN ENGLAND
    'FABULA'
    [Eduardo Paollozzi signature applied by device]
    ©Eduardo Paolozzi
    National
    Art Collections
    Fund
    Decorative art object. Not for food use. Unusual colour pigments may contaminate food
    [printed in gold]
  • Year produced: After 1989
  • Body: Black Basalt
  • Glaze: clear glaze, matt
  • Material: ceramic
  • Decoration: lithographed
  • Accession number: 11656
  • Dimensions: 310 mm (diameter), 15 mm (height)

Other images

Related people

  • Sir Eduardo Paolozzi CBE, ARA Designer

    Sir Eduardo Paolozzi CBE, ARA - Designer (1924 - 2005)

    Sir Eduardo Paolozzi, Queen’s Sculptor in Ordinary to Scotland, produced sculptures for over fifty years until his death in 2005. Born near Edinburgh in 1924, he was the son of Italian immigrants. His father sold ice cream as a means of making a living. In 1940 he inherited the ice cream business, but at night he attended Edinburgh College where he studied Arts in order to become a commercial artist. In 1944 he attended the Slade Art School of Oxford. About 1947 he went to France where he was deeply impressed by the work of Surrealist artists, with his most profound influence coming indirectly from Marcel Duchamp. In the 1960s his sculpture became geometric in origin, and in 1970 he was to design for the Wedgwood factory the series known as ‘Variations on a Geometric Theme’. Comprising six individual silk-screen printed bone china plates, 200 sets of these were produced. Each plate exhibited colour variations. In 1987 Paolozzi was to design again for the Wedgwood factory with ‘The Kalkulium Suite’ – with the six designs appearing again on a bone china medium, and the ‘Quetzalotal’ plate and mug. The 10-inch plates, in fine bone china, were issued in a limited edition of 750. The one-pint mug was in Queen’s ware, and was limited to an edition of 2,000. His latest work for Wedgwood was the magnificent black basalt figure depicting Newton. Inspired by the painting by Blake, the sculpture was originally produced in bronze in order to stand outside The British Library in 1997. The scaled-down version in black basalt was produced in a limited edition by the Wedgwood factory and has received much acclaim.

Glossary

  • The National Art Collections Fund

    The National Art Collections Fund

    The Art Fund (formerly the National Art Collections Fund) is an independent membership-based British charity, which raises funds to aid the acquisition of artworks for the nation. It gives grants and acts as a channel for many gifts and bequests, as well as lobbying on behalf of museums and galleries and their users. The Fund relies on members' subscriptions and public donations for funds and does not receive funding from the government or the National Lottery.

    The Art Fund sponsors the museum of the year award (known as the Gulbenkian Prize from 2003 to 2007 and the Art Fund Prize from 2008 to 2012). This is a £100,000 prize awarded annually to the museum or gallery that had the most imaginative, innovative or popular project during the previous year. In 2009 the Wedgwood Museum won this award.