Sorting and view mode

Collectors Mug 'The Old English Calendar From an 11th Century M.S' - 1963-64

Collectors Mug 'The Old English Calender From an 11th Century M.S', photography m.coupe, © wedgwood museum
    Collectors Mug 'The Old English Calender From an 11th Century M.S', photography m.coupe
    © wedgwood museum

A series of five Historial commemorative mugs all with desriptive backstamps were introduced in1963-64.

A series of five Historial commemorative mugs all with desriptive backstamps were introduced in1963-64. These included 'Shakespeare Characters', a mug depicting the 'Bayeaux Tapestry', the 'Bristol' mug depicting a 17th Century map of the road from London to Bristol by John Ogilby, the 'Canterbury Pilgrims' mug and also the 'English Calendar' mug. All of these were designed by the resident Wedgwood artist, Victor Skellern.

  • Type of object: Teaware/mug
  • Mark: Wedgwood of Etruria and Barlaston

    engraved by the wedgwood studios

    MADE IN ENGLAND [impressed]
  • Year produced: 1963-64
  • Body: Queen's ware, cream-coloured earthenware
  • Material: ceramic
  • Decoration: lithographed
  • Accession number: 12622
  • Dimensions: Height 120 mm Diameter 90 mm

Other images

Related people

  • Victor Skellern

    Victor Skellern (1909 - 1966)

    Victor Skellern was born in Fenton, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire and trained firstly at the Burslem and Hanley Schools of Art, under Gordon Forsyth and Percy Lloyd. At the same time he joined Wedgwood (then based at Etruria) working in the Design Department under John Goodwin, the then Art Director. In 1930 he won a scholarship to study stained glass and its production at the Royal College of Art, and during the ensuing four years he made himself familiar with many aspects of industrial design. In 1934 he returned to the Etruria factory to take over from Goodwin as Art Director and to commence an association with the Wedgwood firm (which in 1940 relocated to Barlaston) that was to last for 31 years, until his retirement in 1965. His influence on Wedgwood showed itself in many ways, with the production of new patterns, shapes, bodies and glazes. During this time he worked in close conjunction with Norman Wilson, the Production Director, who was responsible for evolving revolutionary new matt glazes. He died in 1966.

Glossary

  • Queen’s ware

    Queen’s ware

    In 1765 Wedgwood provided a tea and coffee service to Her Majesty Queen Charlotte (wife of George III) in the new earthenware body he had recently perfected. She was so pleased with the set that she not only allowed Josiah to style himself ‘Potter to Her Majesty’, she also allowed him to call his new earthenware ‘Queen’s ware’ - a name by which Wedgwood’s cream coloured earthenware is still known today.