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Creamware Glacier - 1770

Creamware glacier, © wedgwood museum
    Creamware glacier
    © wedgwood museum

This early Queen's ware glacier dates from about 1770. With a pierced rim and foot and is further decorated with applied ribbon and foliate swag ornaments, glaciers were made for French porcelain services and were used to refrigerate ice or ice-cream.

This early Queen's ware glacier dates from about 1770. With a pierced rim and foot and is further decorated with applied ribbon and foliate swag ornaments, glaciers were made for French porcelain services and were used to refrigerate ice or ice-cream.

  • Type of object: Dinner ware/glacier
  • Mark: Wedgwood
    (Impressed)
  • Year produced: 1770
  • Body: Queen's ware, cream-coloured earthenware
  • Glaze: cream
  • Material: ceramic
  • Decoration: pierced, ornamented
  • Accession number: 1483, 1483a
  • Dimensions: 260 mm (height), 230 mm (width, handle to handle), 180 mm (depth)

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Glossary

  • Queen’s ware

    Queen’s ware

    In 1765 Wedgwood provided a tea and coffee service to Her Majesty Queen Charlotte (wife of George III) in the new earthenware body he had recently perfected. She was so pleased with the set that she not only allowed Josiah to style himself ‘Potter to Her Majesty’, she also allowed him to call his new earthenware ‘Queen’s ware’ - a name by which Wedgwood’s cream coloured earthenware is still known today.

  • Glaciers

    Glaciers

    The term 'glacier' appears to be Josiah Wedgwood's own for a covered ice-cream bowl or refrigerator. These pieces were commonly made for French porcelain services and were known in France as rafraîchissoirs. A glacier in France is either a marker of mirrors or an ice-cream vendor, while a glacière is an ice-house or an ice-box. Wedgwood wrote to Bentley in February 1774: 'I am preparing the Glauciers [sic], the only things now wanting from hence.....to complete it [the frog service]'. This is the earlierst reference to Wedgwood glaciers. They were modelled especially for the Frog service and it is said that the three finials were modelled by Josiah himself. A glacier in four parts appears as design no. 5 in plate 2 of the 1774 Catalogue with a detailed description of its use as a refigerator for ice cream. From 1774 until about 1850 these pieces were made in Queen's ware in many patterns and several shapes, including shell-edge, some decorated with crests, coats of arms and guilding.