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Cup and saucer in Cutaway Leaves pattern - 1938

Cup and saucer in Cutaway Leaves pattern
    Cup and saucer in Cutaway Leaves pattern

This bone china cup and saucer have been decorated with the Cutaway Leaves pattern which was designed by Victor Skellern. It features hand-painted stencil work, edge-lining and has been ground-laid in drake green. This pattern's number is S402. Although originally a 1930s pattern it was revived in the early 1950s.

This bone china cup and saucer have been decorated with the Cutaway Leaves pattern which was designed by Victor Skellern. It features hand-painted stencil work, edge-lining and has been ground-laid in drake green. This pattern's number is S402. Although originally a 1930s pattern it was revived in the early 1950s.

  • Type of object: Teaware/cup and saucer
  • Mark: (Portland vase device)
    WEDGWOOD
    BONE CHINA
    MADE IN ENGLAND
    [Printed in green]
  • Year produced: 1938
  • Body: Bone china
  • Material: ceramic
  • Decoration: hand-painted, ground-layed, edge-lined, stencilled
  • Accession number: 11381a, 11381c
  • Dimensions: 78 mm (height), 150 mm (diameter)

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Related people

  • Victor Skellern Designer

    Victor Skellern - Designer (1909 - 1966)

    Victor Skellern was born in Fenton, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire and trained firstly at the Burslem and Hanley Schools of Art, under Gordon Forsyth and Percy Lloyd. At the same time he joined Wedgwood (then based at Etruria) working in the Design Department under John Goodwin, the then Art Director. In 1930 he won a scholarship to study stained glass and its production at the Royal College of Art, and during the ensuing four years he made himself familiar with many aspects of industrial design. In 1934 he returned to the Etruria factory to take over from Goodwin as Art Director and to commence an association with the Wedgwood firm (which in 1940 relocated to Barlaston) that was to last for 31 years, until his retirement in 1965. His influence on Wedgwood showed itself in many ways, with the production of new patterns, shapes, bodies and glazes. During this time he worked in close conjunction with Norman Wilson, the Production Director, who was responsible for evolving revolutionary new matt glazes. He died in 1966.