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David Rhodes Teapot with Hand Painted Flowers - 1770

Queensware Teapot with Hand Painted Flowers, © Wedgwood Museum
    Queensware Teapot with Hand Painted Flowers
    © Wedgwood Museum

Early Queen's ware (cream coloured earthenware) teapot with hand painted floral decoration and flower shape knob.Attributed to David Rhodes. C. 1770

Early Queen's ware (cream coloured earthenware) teapot with hand painted floral decoration, flower shape knob and cabbage spout. Attributed to David Rhodes. C. 1770 David Rhodes (1777) was an independent enameller and partner in the firm of Robinson & Rhodes of Leeds. Rhodes was Wedgwood’s principal enameller at Newport Street and the Chelsea Decorating Studio. In 1768 Josiah described Rhodes as ‘A master Enameller and China piercer (perhaps an indication that Rhodes was responsible for some pierced or reticulated wares at Leeds)... who is sober and steady ... he paints flowers and landscapes very prettily, prepares a pretty good powder gold, and has a tolerable notion of Colours.”

  • Type of object: Teaware/teapot
  • Mark: Wedgwood

    [Impressed]
  • Year produced: 1770
  • Body: Queen's ware, cream-coloured earthenware
  • Glaze: clear glaze, lead glaze
  • Material: ceramic
  • Decoration: hand-painted, pierced
  • Accession number: 1053, 1053a
  • Dimensions: 130 mm (height), 120 mm (width)

Glossary

  • Queen’s ware

    Queen’s ware

    In 1765 Wedgwood provided a tea and coffee service to Her Majesty Queen Charlotte (wife of George III) in the new earthenware body he had recently perfected. She was so pleased with the set that she not only allowed Josiah to style himself ‘Potter to Her Majesty’, she also allowed him to call his new earthenware ‘Queen’s ware’ - a name by which Wedgwood’s cream coloured earthenware is still known today.