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Drabware plate with crest of King of Denmark - 1822

11199, © Wedgwood Museum
    11199
    © Wedgwood Museum

Dinnerware with the armorial crest of the Prince of Denmark, ordered by King Christian VIII; transfer-printed in black. Drab Ware with gilt edge-lines 1822

Dinnerware with the armorial crest of the Prince of Denmark, ordered by King Christian VIII; transfer-printed in black. Drab Ware with gilt edge-lines 1822. Prince Christian (later King Christian VIII) visited Wedgwood's York showrooms in July 1822 and ordered a large dinner service in drabware , printed with his coat of arms with a gold edge. The original order appears in the Crest Order Book for 22 September 1822. The bulk of this service was sold, with others of the King's effects, in 1881. The armorial ware fashion derived from armorial engraving on silver, and enamelled Chinese export porcelain commissioned from Europe. Initially Wedgwood was reluctant to accept orders of this nature, however by 1776 he was obliged to admit armorial ware had become serious business.

  • Type of object: Dinner ware/plate
  • Mark: WEDGWOOD
    [Impressed]
    *
    [Impressed]
  • Year produced: 1822
  • Body: drabware
  • Glaze: clear glaze
  • Material: ceramic
  • Decoration: bat printed, edge-lined
  • Accession number: 11199
  • Dimensions: 248 mm (length), 23 mm (depth)

Related people

  • Frederick VI - King of Denmark Customer

    Frederick VI - King of Denmark - Customer (1768 - 1839)

    Frederick VI was born in the Christianburg Palace, Copenhagen in 1768. His parents were King Christian VII and Caroline Matilda of Great Britain. From 1784, until his accession to the throne in 1808, Frederick acted as Prince Regent during the period of his father's mental illness. He reigned as King of Denmark from 1808 to 1839, and as King of Norway from 1808 to 1814. Frederick belonged to the House of Oldenburg and died in 1839 aged 71.

Glossary

  • Armorial ware

    Armorial ware

    Ware decorated with the coat of arms or the crest of the owner. The fashion derived from armorial engravings on silver, and enamelled Chinese export porcelain commissioned from Europe.