Sorting and view mode

Earthenware covered broth bowl and saucer with silver lustre decoration - c.1925

Earthenware covered broth bowl and saucer with silver lustre decoration, © Wedgwood Museum
    Earthenware covered broth bowl and saucer with silver lustre decoration
    © Wedgwood Museum

Covered broth bowl with silver lustre decoration. Earthenware. Louise Powell c.1925

Covered broth bowl with silver lustre decoration. Earthenware. Louise Powell c.1925

  • Type of object: Useful ware/bowl
  • Mark: (portland vase motif)
    WEDGWOOD
    MADE IN ENGLAND
    [Printed on bowl and saucer]
    LP
    (monogram)
    3724
    [Painted on bowl and saucer and cover]
  • Year produced: c.1925
  • Decoration: lustre
  • Accession number: 9618

Other images

Related people

  • Alfred and Louise Powell

    Alfred and Louise Powell (1864 - 1960)

    Alfred and Louise Powell were intensely interested in the arts and craft movement. Alfred Powell, born in l865, originally trained as an architect and was particularly interested in taking an active part in encouraging the idea of design and decoration in architecture. In 1903 Alfred Powell visited Etruria after having submitted some designs to the factory. Around 1906 the husband and wife team of Alfred and Louise established a school of free-hand paintresses at Etruria, where the Powells developed free hand designs that could then be applied to items of Wedgwood production by their paintresses. Louise died in 1956, and Alfred in 1960.

Glossary

  • Earthenware

    Earthenware

    Fine-quality earthenwares are white or off-white in colour. Since the middle of the eighteenth century earthenware has contained calcined flint. This gives the ceramic both strength and its lightness of colour. Earthenware is sometimes referred to as cream-coloured earthenware. Since Josiah Wedgwood received the patronage of Queen Charlotte in 1765 Wedgwood cream-coloured earthenwares have been called Queen’s ware.