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Earthenware miniature tureen hand-painted by Emile Lessore - c.1870

Earthenware minature tureen hand-painted by Emile Lessore, © Wedgwood Museum
    Earthenware minature tureen hand-painted by Emile Lessore
    © Wedgwood Museum

Miniature hand-painted tureen and cover. Earthenware. Emile Lessore c.1870

Miniature hand-painted tureen and cover. Earthenware. Emile Lessore c.1870

  • Type of object: Dinner ware/tureen
  • Mark: WEDGWOOD
    [Impressed on base]
  • Year produced: c.1870
  • Decoration: hand-painted
  • Accession number: 3915

Other images

Related people

  • Emile Lessore

    Emile Lessore (1804 - 1875)

    Emile Lessore studied painting in the studio of Ingres and exhibited regularly in the Paris salons for 38 years, winning his first medal in 1831. Lessore initially worked at the Sèvres porcelain factory before moving to Minton. In 1860 Lessore joined Wedgwood where he gained a greater reputation. His work is frequently signed. His work for Wedgwood was exhibited at the London International Exhibition of 1862 and the Paris Exposition Universelle of 1867, and the Vienna Exhibition of 1873. In 1862 Lessore had made an agreement with Wedgwood to return to France where he settled at Marlotte but he continued to work for the company.

Glossary

  • Earthenware

    Earthenware

    Fine-quality earthenwares are white or off-white in colour. Since the middle of the eighteenth century earthenware has contained calcined flint. This gives the ceramic both strength and its lightness of colour. Earthenware is sometimes referred to as cream-coloured earthenware. Since Josiah Wedgwood received the patronage of Queen Charlotte in 1765 Wedgwood cream-coloured earthenwares have been called Queen’s ware.