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Egyptian-style desk set - 1875

obverse, © Wedgwood Museum
    obverse
    © Wedgwood Museum

This desk set in majolica is in the Egyptian style. The tray is in the form of a Nile barge, with its cargo being the writing accoutrements. Here the form of a canopic vase has been used for the inkwell. The set dates from c.1875.

This desk set in majolica is in the Egyptian style. The tray is in the form of a Nile barge, with its cargo being the writing accoutrements. Here the form of a canopic vase has been used for the inkwell. The set dates from c.1875.

  • Type of object: Useful ware/desk tray
  • Mark: WEDGWOOD
    [Impressed]
  • Year produced: 1875
  • Body: Queen's ware, cream-coloured earthenware
  • Material: ceramic
  • Decoration: moulded, majolica
  • Accession number: 9002
  • Dimensions: 302 mm (length), 127 mm (height), 110 mm (width)

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Glossary

  • Ancient Egypt

    Ancient Egypt

    Egyptian civilisation can be traced back to the unity of upper and lower Egypt in about 3000 B.C. From then until the Persian conquest, the nation’s artistic history largely concerns the remarkable temples and funeral monuments built by the pharaohs as part of their worship of the sun-god.

      Each of the three periods of monarchy – the Old, Middle and new Kingdoms – has left distinctive treasures. From the Old Kingdom (c. 2686- 2160 B.C) derive the pyramids and the Great Sphinx (guardian of the royal necropolis). By the New Kingdom era (1570 BC onwards), the pharaohs were buried in tombs, ornately decorated and endowed with gifts. The most famous tomb is that of Tutankhamun (mid 14th century BC), a royal child who ascended the throne at nine years of age by marrying Ankhenenpaaten (to be known as Ankhesenamun), daughter of King Amenophis IV. He appears to have died at 18, having managed to restore the cult of Amun-Re, spirit of the sun-god, which had been abandoned by his predecessor.

    Tutankhamun’s tomb remained undiscovered until its excavation in 1922 by Howard Carter, an English archaeologist, and his sponsor, Lord Canarvon. Its riches included a canopic chest and many alabaster vases; gilded statues of kings and animals; jewels of lapislazuli and turquoise, and as Carter exclaimed: ‘ everywhere the glint of gold’. The entire Tutankhamun collection can be seen in the Cairo Museum.