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Fish platter with 'Trophy' pattern - About 1840

Fish platter with 'Trophy' pattern
    Fish platter with 'Trophy' pattern

Fish platter in Queen's ware with underglaze black transfer printed 'Trophy' pattern. The central design features a still life of fruit, flowers and a wine decanter. The border features regular cartouches with either fruit or military paraphenalia. It is unlikely that the border transfer was designed for this particular size or shape of piece, as at the top edge you can see where the transfer has been applied and where the two ends have met and not matched. This is quite common amongst border design transfers.

Fish platter in Queen's ware with underglaze black transfer printed 'Trophy' pattern. The central design features a still life of fruit, flowers and a wine decanter. The border features regular cartouches with either fruit or military paraphenalia. It is unlikely that the border transfer was designed for this particular size or shape of piece, as at the top edge you can see where the transfer has been applied and where the two ends have met and not matched. This is quite common amongst border design transfers. The platter itself is in poor condition and has been historically mended using a number of metal staples.

  • Type of object: Dinner ware/platter
  • Mark: WEDGWOOD
    2
    2
    [Impressed]
  • Year produced: About 1840
  • Body: Queen's ware, cream-coloured earthenware
  • Glaze: clear glaze
  • Material: ceramic
  • Decoration: transfer-printed
  • Accession number: 11358
  • Dimensions: 522 mm (length), 275 mm (width), 40 mm (depth)

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Glossary

  • Queen’s ware

    Queen’s ware

    In 1765 Wedgwood provided a tea and coffee service to Her Majesty Queen Charlotte (wife of George III) in the new earthenware body he had recently perfected. She was so pleased with the set that she not only allowed Josiah to style himself ‘Potter to Her Majesty’, she also allowed him to call his new earthenware ‘Queen’s ware’ - a name by which Wedgwood’s cream coloured earthenware is still known today.