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Flared jasper bowl designed by Nick Munro - After 2000

Flared bowl designed by Nick Munro
    Flared bowl designed by Nick Munro

In 2000 Wedgwood collaborated with designer Nick Munro to develop a new jasper range, entitled The Nick Munro Collection. On sale in 2000 until 2002, twenty items made up the collection ranging from traditional table ware such as cup and saucer, to more unusual items like dog and cat bowl.

In 2000 Wedgwood collaborated with designer Nick Munro to develop a new Jasper range, entitled The Nick Munro Collection. On sale in 2000 until 2002, twenty items made up the collection ranging from traditional table ware such as cup and saucer, to more unusual items for example dog and cat bowls. Colour theme for this collection was black or stone. This black coloured flared bowl was formed in a mould, body is made from jasper, exterior is unglazed and a clear glaze has been applied to the interior. This bowl was available in two sizes small which had a 150 mm diameter and large which had a 230 mm diameter. This example is the 150 mm version. At launch in 2000 this small flared bowl retailed at £30.00, its larger 230 mm version retailed at £55.00. Manufacturer's mark has been applied using a copper colour, also note that Wedgwood has been stamped onto base under mark.

  • Type of object: Useful ware/bowl
  • Mark: [Nick Munro signature device]
    FOR
    WEDGWOOD®
    MADE IN ENGLAND
    © 1990
    [PRINTED IN COPPER]
    WEDGWOOD
    [stamped under mark]
  • Year produced: After 2000
  • Body: Jasper
  • Glaze: unglazed
  • Material: ceramic
  • Decoration: glazed
  • Accession number: 11411
  • Dimensions: 150 mm (diameter), 60 mm (height)

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Related people

  • Nick Munro

    Nick Munro

    Nick Munro studied engineering and design at Nottingham University, Imperial College of Science and Technology and The Royal College of Art. He won young Entrepreneur of the Year 1988 by turning bed springs into egg cups. Many companies have commissioned work including Wedgwood, P&O, John Lewis, Spode, The V&A Museum and Bugatti in Italy. This designer works with a wide range of material ranging from glass, stainless steel, furniture, ceramics and pewter. Nick has a store in Chester and a website which includes an online store.

Glossary

  • Jasper

    Jasper

    A fine-grained stoneware body developed by Josiah Wedgwood I in the mid 1770s, and the ceramic ware most associated with the name. The most famous colour combination known today is the traditional blue and white, which is usually decorated with classical bas reliefs.

    With changes in architectural styles and the rise in popularity of neo-classical styles of interior decoration Josiah Wedgwood began a series of experiments to create a new ceramic material that would complement the new fashions. Thousands of meticulously recorded experiments were carried out to make a stoneware body that was capable of taking a mineral oxide stain throughout. The search for the jasper body absorbed much of Wedgwood's energy and time, the result being his most important contribution to ceramic history.

    The majority of the actual trials were carried out between December 1772 and December 1774, Josiah writing on the 17 March of the latter year: ‘have for some time past been reviewing my experiments, & I find such Roots, such Seeds as would open & branch out wonderfully if I could nail myself down to the cultivation of them for a year or two'.

    By January 1775 he was ‘absolute' in the production of jasper with coloured grounds. He was also in a position to advertise that he could manufacture bas reliefs, ranging from large plaques to small cameos for mounting as jewellery. The range of colours steadily increased, and by March 1776 Josiah was sending his first specimens of yellow to London. By September experiments were in hand for black jasper. Certainly by Spring of 1777 he was carrying out further experiments to perfect a surface ‘dip' to provide deeper coloured grounds for his cameos; and by the middle of December 1777, he was able to offer Bentley a choice of ‘Green - yellow - lalock [lilac] etc. to the colour of the rooms', referring to the tones favoured by their mutual acquaintance the architect Robert Adam.