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Hermès Wedgwood scarf - 1974

Silk scarf
    Silk scarf

Neo-Classical ornamentation on Wedgwood's jasper has become, since the eighteenth century, a style icon. As with all such iconic designs over time a degree of both imitation and direct copying have occured. This scarf by French fashion house is both named after and clearly inspired by Wedgwood. The scarf depicts a number of framed scenes, in the mode of plaques.

Neo-Classical ornamentation on Wedgwood's jasper has become, since the eighteenth century, a style icon. As with all such iconic designs over time a degree of both imitation and direct copying have occured. This scarf by French fashion house is both named after and clearly inspired by Wedgwood. The scarf depicts a number of framed scenes, in the mode of plaques. Each scene has an equine element, and the majority are not neo-classical in origin although two centaurs are depicted. The central motif depicts a horse drawn carraige - a witty reference to the Hermès logo. Designed by Philippe Ledoux the scarf was issued in a number of colourways.

  • Type of object: Miscellany/scarf
  • Mark: LEDOUX
    [Printed signature on central design]
  • Year produced: 1974
  • Material: silk
  • Accession number: 12354
  • Dimensions: 860 mm (approximate length), 860 mm (approximate width)

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Related people

  • Philippe Ledoux Designer

    Philippe Ledoux - Designer

    Philippe Ledoux was a superb artist and book illustrator in addition to designing popular scarves for Hermes. He specialised in ships and horses, but people were his favourite. His works were a long time favourite of Fakers.

Glossary

  • Hermès

    Hermès

    The House of Hermes was founded by Thierry Hermes (the son of an innkeeper) in 1837. Initially the company supplied bridles and harnesses to coachbuildres and wholesalers, before blooming and growing into the internationally known company of today specialising in silks and scarves.

  • Bas reliefs

    Bas reliefs

    A term referred to raised ornamentation, often of classical origins, and generally applied to stoneware bodies. In the production of jasper the ornamentation is often white.