Sorting and view mode

Intaglio mould depicting Frederick II, Frederick the Great, King of Prussia - 1795

Intaglio mould depicting Frederick William II, Frederick the Great, King of Prussia
    Intaglio mould depicting Frederick William II, Frederick the Great, King of Prussia

Wedgwood and Bentley, biscuit ware intaglio mould, depicting Frederick II, Frederick the Great, of Prussia.

Wedgwood and Bentley, biscuit ware intaglio mould, depicting Frederick II, Frederick the Great, of Prussia. The intaglios formed from this mould did not appear in Wedgwood and Bentley's catalogues during Josiah I's lifetime, however they did appear as number 411 in Boardman's 1817 reprint. It is probable that intaglios formed from this mould were made after 1795.

  • Type of object: Manufacturing paraphernalia and miscellany/mould
  • Mark: FREDERICK THE GREAT OF PRUSSIA.
    411.
    411
    [Written in ink]
  • Year produced: 1795
  • Body: agate
  • Glaze: unglazed
  • Material: ceramic
  • Accession number: 939
  • Dimensions: 45 mm (length), 42 mm (width), 16 mm (depth)

Related people

  • Frederick II (The Great)

    Frederick II (The Great) (1712 - 1786)

    Frederick II (1712-86) King of Prussia; son of Frederick William I of Prussia ans Sophia Dorothea, daughter of George I of England. Frederick was an able and enlightened ruler who laid the foundations of Prussia's future greatness. He wrote extensively on political matters and philosophical subjects and was extremely popular in England, especially during the Seven Years War (1756 - 63). The resources, courage and genius he displayed during his military adventures earned him the sobriquet of 'the Great'. During the Seven Years War he occupied the Meissen factory, and after the war he acquired the Berlin porcelain factory which he had previously patronised.

Glossary

  • Intaglio

    Intaglio

    An Italian term meaning a design created by incising and carving below the surface, which is flat and even, and the opposite of a cameo where the design is in relief. Wedgwood made intaglios in basalts and various coloured dry bodies for use as seals, either mounted in holders or in signet rings. Those intended for mounting in holders could be purchased with shanks for the purpose.

    Early intaglios were polished. They were impressed with the catalogue number, as well as the initials 'W & B' or (after Bentley's death in 1780) 'Wedgwood'. About 1,700 different subjects were available, most of them also to be had in cameo form. They could be obtained in double form, mounted back - to - back, or mounted similarly in conjunction with a cameo of the same size. As in the case of cameos production started in 1771, and to have been well established by 1772.  

  • Catalogues

    Catalogues

    The Wedgwood factory issued both useful ware catalogues, and ornamental ware catalogues. The useful ware catalogues featured items made of cream-coloured earthenware. The ornamental ware catalogues listed cameos, portrait medallions, busts and figures.