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J & G Meakin Wild Berries side plate - After 1980

J & G Meakin Wild Berries side plate
    J & G Meakin Wild Berries side plate

The Wedgwood Museum's collections include not only pieces of Wedgwood but also items made by Wedgwood's subsidiary firms, both before and after their amalgamation into the Wedgwood Group. This J & G Meakin plate from the 1980s is in their Wild Berries pattern on Trend shape.

The Wedgwood Museum's collections include not only pieces of Wedgwood but also items made by Wedgwood's subsidiary firms, both before and after their amalgamation into the Wedgwood Group. This J & G Meakin plate from the 1980s is in their Wild Berries pattern on Trend shape. Trend was introduced in 1975 and the Wild Berries pattern was one of the last designs to be introduced on this shape. The design features a foliate and berry spray in naturalistic colours on a matt straw colured ground. There is an orange band on the border. The backstamp incorporates a spray of the berries. Additionally there is a silhouette of a bull in reference to Meakin's 'Bull in a China Shop' campaign.

  • Type of object: Dinner ware/side plate
  • Mark: (Bull silhouette device)
    J & G MEAKIN
    ©
    MADE IN ENGLAND
    DISHWASHER AND
    MICROWAVE SAFE
    [Printed in brown]
    Wild Berries
    [In italics, printed in pink]
    (Spray of berries)
    [Printed in polychrome]
    19
    [Printed in black]
  • Year produced: After 1980
  • Body: stoneware
  • Glaze: matt straw
  • Material: ceramic
  • Decoration: lithographed
  • Accession number: 12525
  • Dimensions: 180 mm (diameter), 20 mm (depth)

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Glossary

  • J & G Meakin

    J & G Meakin

    J & G Meakin was founded in 1851. The factory became known for producing vast quantities of cheap ironstone china for the home and export markets.

    The firm joined the Wedgwood Group of companies in 1970, which in turn became Waterford Wedgwood plc in later years. Production under the Meakin name ceased in 2000, and their long established works - Eagle Pottery - continued to produce products for Johnson Brothers until all production was moved overseas in 2004. The Eagle Works was demolished in 2005.