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Owl Majolica Salad Bowl - 1880's

Owl Majolica Salad Bowl, © Wedgwood Museum
    Owl Majolica Salad Bowl
    © Wedgwood Museum

Majolica salad bowl with three feet in the shape of owls and electro-plated nickel silver rim, 1880s.

Majolica salad bowl with three feet in the shape of owls and electro-plated nickel silver rim, 1880s. The design of the 'Owl Salad Bowl', according to Patent Registry records, was put forward for registration in class IV (ceramics and glass) at the Patents' Office by 'Proprietors', namely Josiah Wedgwood & Sons of Etruria, Stoke-on-Trent, in February of 1886. The patent was granted and given the record number of 42785. The museum archives hold a copy of the actual patent application of 1886. The bowl is extremely reminiscent of the style which was very much in demand during the latter years of the Victorian period, where natural forms, flora and fauna were very popular as decorative shapes and motifs.

  • Type of object: Dinner ware/salad dish
  • Mark: WEDGWOOD
    [Impressed]
    CKO
    [Impressed]
    R
    [Impressed]
    Rd42785
    [Raised panel]
    f1443
    [Painted]
  • Year produced: 1880's
  • Material: ceramic, metal
  • Decoration: moulded, hand-enamelled, majolica, gilded
  • Accession number: 9597
  • Dimensions: 110 mm (height), 285 mm (width), 283 mm (depth)

Glossary

  • Majolica

    Majolica

    Majolica ware consists of an earthenware body which can be cast or moulded into a wide variety of shapes (including umbrella stands, garden pots, salad bowls etc.) and which is then decorated with a selection of oxide-rich opaque glazes of varying hues. Produced at the old Etruria factory between 1860 and 1910, Majolica proved to be particularly popular with the Victorians.