Sorting and view mode

Portrait medallion depicting Geoffrey Chaucer - 1973

Portrait medallion depicting Geoffrey Chaucer
    Portrait medallion depicting Geoffrey Chaucer

White on pale blue jasper portrait medallion depicting Geoffrey Chaucer, modelled by Charles Toft circa 1880.

White on pale blue jasper portrait medallion depicting Geoffrey Chaucer, modelled by Charles Toft circa 1880. This is the second and larger portrait and the original source is the portrait in Thomas Occleve's poem "De Regimine Principum". Chaucer is known as the Father of English Literature and is widely considered the greatest English poet of the Middle Ages and the first poet to be buried in Poets' Corner of Westminster Abbey. He also achieved success as an author, philosopher, and astronomer, composing a scientific treatise on the astrolabe for his ten-year-old son Lewis. Chaucer also maintained an active career in the civil service as a bureaucrat, courtier and diplomat. However he will always be most known as the author of The Canterbury Tales.

  • Type of object: Plaques and medallions/portrait medallion
  • Mark: WEDGWOOD
    MADE IN
    ENGLAND
    73
    M
    E
    [Impressed]
  • Year produced: 1973
  • Body: Jasper
  • Glaze: unglazed
  • Material: ceramic
  • Decoration: ornamented
  • Accession number: 12714
  • Dimensions: 148 mm (length), 114 mm (width), 20 mm (approximate depth)

Other images

Related people

  • Geoffrey Chaucer Subject

    Geoffrey Chaucer - Subject (1343 - 1400)

    Born in London circa 1343, Geoffrey was regarded as the finest English poet of the Middle Ages. He was also an author, philosopher, bureaucrat, diplomat and known as the Father of English Literature. Among his many works, he is best known for 'The Canterbury Tales'. He died in 1400, and was the first poet to be buried in Poet's Corner within Westminster Abbey.

Glossary

  • Portrait Medallion

    Portrait Medallion

     

    A medallion, either circular or oval, made usually from black basalt or jasper, which features a head or head and shoulders study, rather than a relief of a classical nature.