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Queen’s ware figurine, The Paintress by Arnold Machin - 1975

Queen’s ware figurine, The Paintress by Arnold Machin
    Queen’s ware figurine, The Paintress by Arnold Machin

This Queen’s ware figurine of a paintress was modelled by artist Arnold Machin. In 1940 Arnold Machin became the first full-time figure modeller to be employed at Wedgwood’s Barlaston factory and produced many pieces in a variety of ceramic bodies, including Queen’s ware, Windsor grey and terra cotta.

This Queen’s ware figurine of a paintress was modelled by artist Arnold Machin. In 1940 Arnold Machin became the first full-time figure modeller to be employed at Wedgwood’s Barlaston factory and produced many pieces in a variety of ceramic bodies, including Queen’s ware, Windsor grey and terra cotta. The pieces he created for Wedgwood during the Second World War were simple so that they required the minimum of craftsmanship to produce a good result, a reaction to the fact that many of the factory’s personnel were involved in war-work. The piece is a figure modelled in Queen’s ware as a paintress and the floral style decoration was painted by Millicent Taplin. This is part of a trio of objects with a pottery theme, depicting traditional manufacturing methods associated with the Stoke-on-Trent area. The other related objects are ‘The Placer’ and ‘The Thrower’, both on display at the Wedgwood Museum. This piece was originally created C.1942 and although this particular object is a later reproduction from 1975, it was still decorated by Millicent Taplin.

  • Type of object: Portraits and figures/figurine
  • Mark: MADE IN ENGLAND
    A. M.
    75 D
    [Impressed into base]

    WEDGWOOD
    [Impressed into object surface]
  • Year produced: 1975
  • Body: Queen's ware, cream-coloured earthenware
  • Glaze: clear glaze
  • Material: ceramic
  • Decoration: hand-painted
  • Accession number: 9832
  • Dimensions: H: 260 mm, W: 115 mm, D: 160 mm

Other images

Related people

  • Arnold Machin Modeler

    Arnold Machin - Modeler (1911 - 1999)

    Machin was born in Stoke-on-Trent in 1911. He started work at the age of 14 as an apprentice china painter at the Minton Pottery, and during the Depression he learnt to sculpt at the Art School in Stoke-on-Trent. He later moved to Derby, and the Royal Academy in London. After spending the Second World War as a conscientious objector, he returned to modelling and sculpture, and created many notable ceramics which are now prized collectors' items. In 1946 he was elected an associate member of the Royal Academy, was appointed a Master of Sculpture from 1959 to 1966 and became the longest-serving member of the Academy. He was elected an Academician in 1956 and a Fellow of the Royal Society of British Sculptors. From 1951 he was a tutor at the Royal College of Art, where he entered the culture that was to bring him his most celebrated commissions. He was probably best remembered for the designing of the new decimal coinage effigies of Queen Elizabeth in 1964 and 1967 and for the definitive issue of postage stamps in 1967.

  • Millicent Taplin Artist

    Millicent Taplin - Artist (1902 - 1980)

    Millicent Jane Taplin commenced at the old Etruria factory in 1917, having previously attended evening classes at the Stoke School of Art. She then commenced to work at Etruria under the surveillance of Alfred and Louise Powell, who had established a School of free-hand paintresses at the Etruria factory works. Eventually, Millicent Taplin was to head the paintresses in the hand-crafts studio both at Etruria and Barlaston. She married in 1932 and in 1935 started to teach design and painting at the art school where she had originally been a student. During the late 1930s she became one of the more prolific designers for Wedgwood creating both printed and painted patterns for use on bone china as well as Queen’s ware and other ceramic bodies.One of her first designs was 'Kingcup', but one of the most successful was 'Strawberry Hill' which was designed jointly with Victor Skellern and honoured by a Design of the Year Award by the Council of Industrial Design in 1957. Around 1956 Miss Taplin took over the running of the newly combined china and earthenware hand-painting departments, remaining there until her retirement in 1962. She died in 1980.

Glossary

  • Queen’s ware

    Queen’s ware

    In 1765 Wedgwood provided a tea and coffee service to Her Majesty Queen Charlotte (wife of George III) in the new earthenware body he had recently perfected. She was so pleased with the set that she not only allowed Josiah to style himself ‘Potter to Her Majesty’, she also allowed him to call his new earthenware ‘Queen’s ware’ - a name by which Wedgwood’s cream coloured earthenware is still known today.

  • Placer

    Placer

    After pottery pieces were placed inside a sagger for protection, a placer would carry them into the kiln and arrange them. The saggars were balanced on the placer’s head or shoulders to move them around. This led to placers protecting their heads by rolling up old stockings and wedging them into the front of their caps, which also kept the saggar in place.