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Queen's ware miniature tea set made for Queen Mary, by Harry Barnard - 1924

Queensware miniature tea set made for Queen Mary, photography M.Coupe
    Queensware miniature tea set made for Queen Mary, photography M.Coupe

Toy ware or ‘miniatures’ first commenced in popularity as far as ceramics manufacturers were concerned for commercial purposes in the 18th century, and proved to be particularly popular throughout the 19th century. At the Wedgwood factory a wide range of ‘toy’ ware, otherwise known as ‘miniatures’ were produced in a variety of ceramic bodies including cream coloured earthenware, drab ware, jasper, black basalt, and (more rarely) the bone china body. This 13 piece miniature breakfast set was designed and produced by Harry Barnard for Queens Mary’s doll’s house at Windsor Castle. The doll’s house was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens.

Toy ware or ‘miniatures’ first commenced in popularity as far as ceramics manufacturers were concerned for commercial purposes in the 18th century, and proved to be particularly popular throughout the 19th century. At the Wedgwood factory a wide range of ‘toy’ ware, otherwise known as ‘miniatures’ were produced in a variety of ceramic bodies including cream coloured earthenware, drab ware, jasper, black basalt, and (more rarely) the bone china body. This 13 piece miniature breakfast set was designed and produced by Harry Barnard for Queens Mary’s doll’s house at Windsor Castle. The doll’s house was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens. At the age of 15 after leaving school Barnard worked in a modelling shop in London, leaving to enrol at the Royal School (now Royal College) of Art where he studied drawing and modelling. From 1880 he worked for various ceramic companies such as, Doulton and James Macintyre, before joining Wedgwoods in 1896. He was able to apply his expertise in hand-crafted wares - for example slip decorating, jewelling, sgraffito and pate-sur-pate to its fullest extent. He utilised his art techniques on traditional Wedgwood Ceramic bodies, such as jasper and black basalt. The body of this set is lavender, a coloured body first developed in the 1850s. A clear glaze has been applied to the exterior and interior. Thirteen pieces make of this set item include five plates, two saucers, one sugar bowl with cover, one coffee pot with cover, one coffee cup and one cream jug. The cream jug has been damaged and is missing its handle, this provides an excellent opportunity to see a cross section view of that piece's main body material and glaze decoration.

  • Type of object: Useful ware/children's toy services
  • Mark: (Unmarked)
  • Year produced: 1924
  • Body: lavender
  • Glaze: clear glaze
  • Material: ceramic
  • Accession number: 14253, 14253a, 14253b, 14253c, 14253d, 14253e, 14253f, 14253g, 14253h, 14253i, 14253j, 14253k, 14253l
  • Dimensions: Dimensions of coffee pot, 14253i, largest item in this set: 12 mm (height), 16 mm (width), 10 mm (depth). Dimensions of coffee pot cover, 14253k, smallest item in this set: 7 mm (height), 8 mm (width),

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Related people

  • HM Queen Mary Associated

    HM Queen Mary - Associated (1867 - 1953)

    Born Princess Victoria of Teck at Kensington Palace in 1867, she was betrothed initially to Prince Albert, the eldest son of the Prince of Wales. However Albert died suddenly of pneumonia, and Mary eventually married his younger brother George who went on to become HM King George V. As Queen Consort she supported her husband through the traumas of the First World War and it's aftermath. George V died in 1936 and was succeeded by his eldest son Edward. Edward abdicated prior to his coronation in order to marry the twice-divorced New York socialite Mrs Wallis Simpson. Queen Mary then supported her second son Albert in his reign as George VI until his death in 1952. Queen Mary died the following year. She is renowned for having set the standard and style of the British Monarchy in the twentieth century.

  • Harry Barnard Designer and maker

    Harry Barnard - Designer and maker (1862 - 1933)

    Harry Barnard left school at the age of 15 to work in a modelling shop in London, he later left this position to enrol at the Royal School (now Royal College) of Art where he studied drawing and modelling. In l880 he joined the Doulton Lambeth Studios, working under the supervision of Mark Marshall. At the age of 22 he was the under-manager of the extensive studios (which then employed 325 women and 45 men and boys). All the work produced was hand-crafted. In February 1895 he left Doulton to join the Cobridge based firm of James Macintyre. A year later he joined the Wedgwood factory at Etruria. He was able to apply his expertise in hand-crafted wares - for example slip decorating, jewelling, sgraffito and pate-sur-pate to its fullest extent. He utilised his art techniques on traditional Wedgwood Ceramic bodies, such as Jasper and Black Basalt. He also produced designs for production in bone china, stone ware, Majolica and tiles. For a number of years between 1902 and 1919 he became the Wedgwood London Manager, returning to the factory he collaborated on special projects such as a new edition of the famed Portland Vase. He also assisted extensively with the factory Museum, and both wrote and lectured on Wedgwood ware and history. He continued to design and decorate individual art wares until his death in 1933.

  • Sir Edwin Lutyens Associated

    Sir Edwin Lutyens - Associated (1869 - 1944)

    Born in London in 1869 and knighted in 1918, Sir Edwin Lutyens was a British architect who designed many English country houses. He was best known for his ability to adapt traditional architecture to the needs of his era. Lutyens had an instrumental role in the design and building of New Delhi, which later became the seat of the Government of India. Before the end of World War I, he was appointed one of the three architects by the War Graves Commission to be involved in the creation of many monuments to commemorate the dead. The most famous and well-known of these monuments is the Cenotaph in London's Whitehall.

Glossary

  • Windsor Castle

    Windsor Castle

    Windsor Castle lies to the west of London in Windsor in the county of Berkshire and is a royal residence within sight of Heathrow Airport. The original castle was built in the eleventh century and is notable for its long association with the British Royal Family and for its architecture. The castle acted as a refuge for the Royal Family during the second world war and survived a major fire in 1992.

    Today Windsor Castle is a popular tourist attraction and remains the preferred weekend home of Her Majesty the Queen.