Sorting and view mode

Queen's ware Oriental Tea Set teapot - c.1871

Queen's ware Oriental Tea Set teapot
    Queen's ware Oriental Tea Set teapot

This teapot is part of an embossed and gilded Queen's ware tea set known as the Oriental Tea Set. Designed and registered in 1871 the design takes inspiration from the much earlier (c.1779) cane ware teapots moulded to resemble cut bamboo stalks or canes. This teapot is similarly moulded and additionally has a cream glazed embellished with gold painting. Although no exact year of manufacture can be given it is most likely to have been manufactured soon after the date the design was registered.

This teapot is part of an embossed and gilded Queen's ware tea set known as the Oriental Tea Set. Designed and registered in 1871 the design takes inspiration from the much earlier (c.1779) cane ware teapots moulded to resemble cut bamboo stalks or canes. This teapot is similarly moulded and additionally has a cream glazed embellished with gold painting. Although no exact year of manufacture can be given it is most likely to have been manufactured soon after the date the design was registered.The bottom of the teapot contains a design registry mark which tells us that the design of the Oriental Tea Set was registered by Josiah Wedgwood & Sons on the 24th April, 1871.

  • Type of object: Teaware/teapot
  • Mark: WEDGWOOD
    HBF
    A
    (Design Registry diamond device)
    [Impressed]
    7450
    [Painted]
  • Year produced: c.1871
  • Body: Queen's ware, cream-coloured earthenware
  • Glaze: cream
  • Material: ceramic
  • Decoration: moulded, hand-coloured
  • Accession number: 10851, 10851a
  • Dimensions: 140 mm (height), 165 mm (length), 100 mm (width)

Other images

Glossary

  • Queen’s ware

    Queen’s ware

    In 1765 Wedgwood provided a tea and coffee service to Her Majesty Queen Charlotte (wife of George III) in the new earthenware body he had recently perfected. She was so pleased with the set that she not only allowed Josiah to style himself ‘Potter to Her Majesty’, she also allowed him to call his new earthenware ‘Queen’s ware’ - a name by which Wedgwood’s cream coloured earthenware is still known today.

  • Design registry mark

    Design registry mark

    Design registry mark. Starting in 1842, England has offered registration of its decorative designs for pottery, glass, porcelain, paper and wood. An item with a registry mark or number could have been produced before or after the date of the registry mark. 

    The Public Record Office and the British Government tend to enforce these marks and numbers so protecting UK based manufacturers and collectors alike. (There have been cases where overseas production companies have been sued following attempts to copy marks and numbers as well as designs.