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Simple Yet Perfect teapot - 1906

Simple Yet Perfect teapot
    Simple Yet Perfect teapot

The concept of the SYP, or Simple Yet Perfect, teapot was the brainchild of Sir Douglas Baillie Hamilton Cochrane, the 12th Earl of Dundonald. His first design for the SYP teapot was patented in 1901, and the second and "improved" teapot came four months later - this was the version which was manufactured by Wedgwood's Etruria factory between 1905 and 1919 as well as several other potters. A horizontal, perforated ledge separates the dry tea from the hot water. When the teapot is tilted backwards it rests on two short legs at the back and on the curved handle, allowing the hot water to pass through the perforations on to the tea leaves. When the tea is brewed, the pot is set down on its base and the tea is ready to be poured through the conventional spout. The separation of the used tea leaves from the prepared tea prevents it from becoming 'stewed'. The examples made by Wedgwood are the most numerous. The teapots were issued in plain creamware, or could be enhanced by the addition of blue-printed patterns such as ‘Peony’ or ‘Oaklands’ such as this example.

The concept of the SYP, or Simple Yet Perfect, teapot was the brainchild of Sir Douglas Baillie Hamilton Cochrane, the 12th Earl of Dundonald. His first design for the SYP teapot was patented in 1901, and the second and "improved" teapot came four months later - this was the version which was manufactured by Wedgwood's Etruria factory between 1905 and 1919 as well as several other potters. A horizontal, perforated ledge separates the dry tea from the hot water. When the teapot is tilted backwards it rests on two short legs at the back and on the curved handle, allowing the hot water to pass through the perforations on to the tea leaves. When the tea is brewed, the pot is set down on its base and the tea is ready to be poured through the conventional spout. The separation of the used tea leaves from the prepared tea prevents it from becoming 'stewed'. The examples made by Wedgwood are the most numerous. The teapots were issued in plain creamware, or could be enhanced by the addition of blue-printed patterns such as ‘Peony’ or ‘Oaklands’ such as this example.

  • Type of object: Teaware/teapot
  • Mark: OAKLANDS
    TRADE MARK
    WEDGWOOD
    [Printed in blue on base]
    PATENT
    SYP
    [Impressed on base]
    D
    [Impressed on base]
    BV1
    [Impressed on base]
    THE PATENT S.Y.P TEAPOT COMPANY
    6 STRAND ON THE GREEN
    CHISWICK
    LONDON
    TRADEMARK
    [Printed on lid]
    M
    [Impress on lid]
  • Year produced: 1906
  • Body: pearlware
  • Glaze: pearl
  • Material: ceramic
  • Decoration: under-glaze blue-painted and printed
  • Accession number: 5489a, 5489b
  • Dimensions: 155 mm (height), 154 mm (width, handle to spout), 105 mm (depth)

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