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Tea set made for Wedgwood children- jug - c.1866

Tea set made for Wedgwood children- bowl, © Wedgwood Museum
    Tea set made for Wedgwood children- bowl
    © Wedgwood Museum

Teaware made for the Wedgwood children, decorated with a variety of printed and drawn subjects; mostly left in outline, some coloured. Pearlware. Emile Lessore c.1866

Teaware made for the Wedgwood children, decorated with a variety of printed and drawn subjects; mostly left in outline, some coloured. Pearlware. Emile Lessore c.1866

  • Type of object: Useful ware/children's toy services
  • Mark: WEDGWOOD
    AR
    [Impressed]
    L
    [Impressed]
  • Year produced: c.1866
  • Body: pearlware
  • Material: ceramic
  • Accession number: 9623d
  • Dimensions: 155 mm (height), 130 mm (width), 103 mm (depth)

Related people

  • Emile Lessore Designer

    Emile Lessore - Designer (1804 - 1875)

    Emile Lessore studied painting in the studio of Ingres and exhibited regularly in the Paris salons for 38 years, winning his first medal in 1831. Lessore initially worked at the Sèvres porcelain factory before moving to Minton. In 1860 Lessore joined Wedgwood where he gained a greater reputation. His work is frequently signed. His work for Wedgwood was exhibited at the London International Exhibition of 1862 and the Paris Exposition Universelle of 1867, and the Vienna Exhibition of 1873. In 1862 Lessore had made an agreement with Wedgwood to return to France where he settled at Marlotte but he continued to work for the company.

Glossary

  • Pearlware

    Pearlware

     

    Essentially an earthenware body, which has had extra flint added to the initial clay-mix and cobalt to the glaze, to enhance the overall blue-white appearance of the ware. Initially perfected by Josiah Wedgwood I in around 1779, this ceramic ware was basically developed to meet the competition of imported blue-decorated Chinese porcelain. Production of this particular ceramic body continued until 1940.

    The development of pearlware by Josiah Wedgwood was a response to his fear that Queen's ware had become so popular that it was losing it's cachet amongst his clientele. For example on the 6th August 1779 Josiah wrote to Thomas Bentley "I should not hesitate a moment in prefering the creamware if I consulted my own taste and sentiments but you know what Lady Dartmouth told us , that she & her friends were tired of creamcolour & so they would of Angels if they were shown for sale in every chandlers shop throughout the time."