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Teapot in Cretan pattern - 1922

Teapot in Cretan pattern
    Teapot in Cretan pattern

This teapot is part of a teaset in Cretan pattern. It was designed by Daisy Makeig-Jones and features a range of ancient symbols in its design. These include Celtic bosses, Cretan-style figures and even fylfots, now better known as swastikas. The design dates from 1923, before that ancient holy symbol had been adopted by the German Nazi party. The figures in the Cretan pattern are stylised and angular and gained the nickname 'furnacemen' on the factory floor while the design was in production. Each piece in the teaset has a form known as the Grecian Teas shape.

This teapot is part of a teaset in Cretan pattern. It was designed by Daisy Makeig-Jones and features a range of ancient symbols in its design. These include Celtic bosses, Cretan-style figures and even fylfots, now better known as swastikas. The design dates from 1923, before that ancient holy symbol had been adopted by the German Nazi party. The figures in the Cretan pattern are stylised and angular and gained the nickname 'furnacemen' on the factory floor while the design was in production. Each piece in the teaset has a form known as the Grecian Teas shape.

  • Type of object: Teaware/teapot
  • Mark: CRETAN
    WEDGWOOD
    ETRURIA.ENGLAND
    [Printed in blue]
    WEDGWOOD
    [Impressed]
    MADE IN ENGLAND
    [Impressed]
    36
    Impressed]
    RTL
    [Impressed]
  • Year produced: 1922
  • Body: Queen's ware, cream-coloured earthenware
  • Glaze: cream
  • Material: ceramic
  • Decoration: transfer-printed
  • Accession number: 11043a, 11043b
  • Dimensions: 115 mm (height), 171 mm (width, handle to spout), 107 mm (depth)

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Related people

  • 'Daisy' Makeig-Jones (Susannah Margaretta) Designer

    'Daisy' Makeig-Jones (Susannah Margaretta) - Designer (1880 - 1944)

    Susannah Margaretta "Daisy" Makeig-Jones was a pottery designer for Wedgwood. She is best known for her range of "Fairyland Lustre" pottery.The daughter of a doctor, she was born in Rotherham. After her family moved to Torquay she entered the Torquay School of Art. She joined Wedgwood in 1909, after gaining an introduction to the managing director Cecil Wedgwood through a relative. Both of Cecil's daughters married brothers of hers. According to factory history, Daisy was asked to leave Wedgwood in 1930. She refused to go, maintaining she was part of the family. She left of her own accord not long afterwards making the dramatic gesture of smashing her pots as she went!