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Terra cotta sculpture, 'Lucrecia' by Arnold Machin - c.1940s

Terra cotta sculpture, 'Lucrecia' by Arnold Machin, © Wedgwood Museum
    Terra cotta sculpture, 'Lucrecia' by Arnold Machin
    © Wedgwood Museum

This large unglazed terra cotta bust is known as ‘Lucrecia’ and was sculpted by Arnold Machin. In 1940 Machin became the first full-time figure modeller to be employed at Wedgwood’s Barlaston factory and produced many pieces in a variety of ceramic bodies, including Queen’s ware, Windsor grey and terra cotta.

This large unglazed terra cotta bust is known as ‘Lucrecia’ and was sculpted by Arnold Machin. In 1940 Machin became the first full-time figure modeller to be employed at Wedgwood’s Barlaston factory and produced many pieces in a variety of ceramic bodies, including Queen’s ware, Windsor grey and terra cotta. The pieces he created for Wedgwood during the Second World War were simple so that they required the minimum of craftsmanship to produce a good result, this was a reaction to the fact that many of the factory’s personnel were involved in war-work. The piece depicts a female figure, with her head turned to the left and her torso is sculpted so that it appears to be draped with thin fabric. Machin sculpted many portrait pieces throughout his career and the museum has another example on display, which is known as ‘Madeleine’. This was made C.1940s.

  • Type of object: Portraits and figures/sculpture
  • Mark: LUCRECIA
    [Handwritten in white]
    AM7
    [Painted]
  • Year produced: c.1940s
  • Body: terra cotta
  • Glaze: unglazed
  • Material: ceramic
  • Accession number: 5493
  • Dimensions: H: 540 mm, D: 270 mm, W: 330 mm

Related people

  • Arnold Machin Sculptor

    Arnold Machin - Sculptor (1911 - 1999)

    Machin was born in Stoke-on-Trent in 1911. He started work at the age of 14 as an apprentice china painter at the Minton Pottery, and during the Depression he learnt to sculpt at the Art School in Stoke-on-Trent. He later moved to Derby, and the Royal Academy in London. After spending the Second World War as a conscientious objector, he returned to modelling and sculpture, and created many notable ceramics which are now prized collectors' items. In 1946 he was elected an associate member of the Royal Academy, was appointed a Master of Sculpture from 1959 to 1966 and became the longest-serving member of the Academy. He was elected an Academician in 1956 and a Fellow of the Royal Society of British Sculptors. From 1951 he was a tutor at the Royal College of Art, where he entered the culture that was to bring him his most celebrated commissions. He was probably best remembered for the designing of the new decimal coinage effigies of Queen Elizabeth in 1964 and 1967 and for the definitive issue of postage stamps in 1967.