Sorting and view mode

Twig basket stand - 1951

Twig basket stand, Jim Haywood, © The Wedgwood museum
    Twig basket stand, Jim Haywood
    © The Wedgwood museum

Twig baskets were first advertised by Wedgwood in his 1774 Queen's ware catalogue. They are delicate circular or oval fruit baskets which are formed from woven strips of clay. These strips have been extruded from a special die known as a dod. Twig baskets have been produced by Wedgwood intermittently since, and are today noted as prestige items. Oval or circular stands, such as this item, were also illustrated in the 1774 Catalogue.

Twig baskets were first advertised by Wedgwood in his 1774 Queen's ware catalogue. They are delicate circular or oval fruit baskets which are formed from woven strips of clay. These strips have been extruded from a special die known as a dod. Twig baskets have been produced by Wedgwood intermittently since, and are today noted as prestige items. Oval or circular stands, such as this item, were also illustrated in the 1774 Catalogue. Decorated with a moulded centre in the form of basket work they are further decorated with a pierced edge. This 20th Century example is dated 1951.

  • Type of object: Ornamental ware/basket
  • Mark: 1951
    WEDGWOOD
    [Impressed]
  • Year produced: 1951
  • Body: Queen's ware, cream-coloured earthenware
  • Glaze: cream
  • Material: ceramic
  • Decoration: moulded, pierced
  • Accession number: 13795
  • Dimensions: 224 mm (diameter), 23 mm (depth)

Other images

Glossary

  • Queen’s ware

    Queen’s ware

    In 1765 Wedgwood provided a tea and coffee service to Her Majesty Queen Charlotte (wife of George III) in the new earthenware body he had recently perfected. She was so pleased with the set that she not only allowed Josiah to style himself ‘Potter to Her Majesty’, she also allowed him to call his new earthenware ‘Queen’s ware’ - a name by which Wedgwood’s cream coloured earthenware is still known today.